Pages

Tuesday, 30 July 2013

Reading list for English 10021 Reading Literature

English 10021: Reading Literature

 

Description:  This course, divided into four units—reading prose, reading poetry, reading drama, and reading popular culture—is designed to introduce students to some of the principal texts and techniques of literary study.  As the course title suggests, it is particularly concerned with the techniques of advanced rhetorical analysis or “close reading.”

 

Readings: 

                The following is a list of the books that you will be asked to purchase for this course, and may wish to begin reading over the summer.  Additional course readings will be provided in August. 

                You are also strongly encouraged to purchase the following reference books, both of which you will need throughout your studies here at Manchester.

                1. A reputable academic grammar and style guide, such as The Penguin Writer’s Manual (Penguin, 2002), ISBN 978-0140514896.

                2. A dictionary of literary terms, such as The Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory (Penguin, 1999), ISBN 978-0140513639  OR  The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (Oxford University Press, 2008), ISBN 978-0199208272.

 

                Although some of the following texts are available in different editions, you are encouraged to read the recommended editions for a number of reasons: they are in some cases the definitive editions; they may include essential critical essays; and the lecturers and seminar leaders will refer to page numbers from these editions.   

 

- Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness, ed. Paul B. Armstrong (New York: Norton

Critical Editions, 2006).  

- William Shakespeare, King Lear, ed. R.A. Foakes (New Arden, 3rd series,           1997).

- Bertolt Brecht, Life of Galileo, trans. John Willett, ed. Hugh Rorrison (London: Methuen, 1986).

- Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, an authoritative text, backgrounds and          sources, criticism, edited by Donald Gray (New York: Norton Critical           Editions, 2001).

 

No comments:

Post a Comment